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News and Discussions on Payroll, HR & Employment Law

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Author Archive - Occasional Contributors

In addition to our regular guest bloggers, First Reference Talks blog published by First Reference, provides occasional guest post opportunities from various subject matter experts on the topics of payroll, employment and labour law, payroll, HR analytics, corporate immigration, accessibility related issues in Canada. If you are a subject matter expert and would like to become an occasional blogger, please contact Yosie Saint-Cyr at editor@firstreference.com. If you liked this post, subscribe to First Reference Talks blog to get regular updates.

Projet de loi C-65 – Modifications au Code canadien du travail portant sur le harcèlement et la violence sexuels

Dans la foulée des allégations d’inconduite sexuelle, les débats devraient commencer sur le projet de loi C‑65 du gouvernement fédéral. S’il est adopté, ce projet de loi renforcerait les protections contre la violence et le harcèlement au travail, y compris le harcèlement et la violence sexuels, dans les milieux de travail de réglementation fédérale.

 

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Occupational Health and Safety: Duty to report and protection against reprisal

Employers should be particularly alert to the provisions of OHS Acts in considering actions taken by workers outside of the usual lines of reporting at the workplace where unsafe work conditions are alleged. The OHS Acts of each province in Atlantic Canada imbue workers with specific rights related to workplace safety.

 

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The Supreme Court of Canada issues landmark decision on the scope of human rights legislation

The Supreme Court of Canada recently issued a much-anticipated decision on the scope of human rights legislation, finding that the British Columbia Human Rights Code is not limitless in its scope, and instead created a new contextual test to determine whether alleged discriminatory conduct is conduct within the scope of the Code.

 

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Workers now eligible for WSIB benefits for chronic mental stress and workplace harassment

The recent changes to the Workplace Safety and Insurance Act may well be a blessing for employees without other remedy or recourse. At this time, it appears possible that employees who have been subject to chronic workplace stress may be able to apply to the WSIB for some form of benefit. What the WSIB and the WSIAT do with this new entitlement is yet to be seen.

 

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Top five cases of importance to Ontario employment law – 2017 edition

2017 has been an incredibly busy year for Ontario employment law practitioners. In addition to the changes to the common law brought about by the decisions considered in this post, one would be foolish to omit any reference to the sweeping changes recently ushered in by the Wynne government as a result of the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017, S.O. 2017 C.22 (“Bill 148”).

 

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Free prescription drug coverage for Ontario youth

Starting January 1st, 2018, prescription drugs will be free for Ontarians aged 24 and under. Ontario’s Youth Pharmacare, also known as OHIP+, is the first universal drug program of its kind in Canada. It represents a major step forward in providing health care savings for individuals, families, and employers alike.

 

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The legalities of criminal, credit and medical checks in HR

Many employers requesting personal information related to criminal, credit or medical circumstances may consider the requests to be legitimate in creating or maintaining the working relationship. However, they should be careful what they wish for.

 

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The #metoo moment

The sudden fall from grace of film producer Harvey Weinstein, over sexual harassment allegations, has proven to be the first rock in a landslide; in the weeks since, women everywhere have begun to voice complaints about past and ongoing instances of unwelcome sexual attention.

 

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Clock on limitation period for wrongful dismissal claim starts on day of notice – not last day worked

A recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice confirms that the limitation period in respect of a wrongful dismissal claim commences on the day that the employee is provided notice of the termination, not on the last day the employee works.

 

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Le délai de prescription d’une action pour congédiement injustifié court à compter du jour du préavis – et non à compter du dernier jour de travail

Dans une récente décision, la Cour supérieure de justice de l’Ontario confirme que le délai de prescription d’une action pour congédiement injustifié court à compter du jour où l’employé reçoit le préavis de congédiement, et non à compter de son dernier jour de travail.

 

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Entitlement to bereavement leave in Ontario

How much paid bereavement leave is an hourly employee entitled to in Ontario? And what constitutes “evidence reasonable in the circumstances” to demonstrate entitlement to personal emergency leave?

 

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Dishonesty in hiring process constitutes cause for dismissal

A recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has confirmed that, in certain scenarios, an employee’s dishonesty in the hiring process will constitute cause for dismissal. In this case, the plaintiff’s claim for wrongful termination was dismissed when the court found that the plaintiff’s omission on a security questionnaire amounted to dishonesty that went to the core of the employment relationship and was irreconcilable with sustained employment.

 

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Federal undertakings involved in construction projects are not subject to a provincial occupational health and safety legislation

Are the provisions of chapter XI of the Act respecting Occupational Health and Safety, pertaining to construction sites and principal contractors, constitutionally applicable to federal undertakings? Such is the question that the Superior Court of Quebec has responded to in Commission des normes, de l’équité, de la santé et de la sécurité du travail c. Commission des lésions professionnelles, 2016 QCCS 2424.

 

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Les entreprises fédérales qui effectuent des travaux de construction ne sont pas assujetties à la Loi sur la santé et de la sécurité du travail provinciale

Les dispositions du chapitre XI de la Loi sur la santé et la sécurité du travail (la LSST) touchant aux chantiers de construction et à la maîtrise d’œuvre des chantiers sont-elles constitutionnellement applicables aux entreprises de compétence fédérale? Telle est la question à laquelle répond la Cour supérieure du Québec dans la récente décision Commission des normes, de l’équité, de la santé et de la sécurité du travail c. Commission des lésions professionnelles, 2016 QCCS 2424.

 

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A six step guide to employee recognition

Have you ever wondered how you could implement an employee recognition program and why you would need one?

 

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