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Employee Relations

WCB to employers: You need policies before Canada legalizes marijuana

Canada legalizes marijuana

On March 21, 2017, at a breakout session during a convention on the topic of Canada legalizing marijuana, a spokesperson for the Saskatchewan Workers’ Compensation Board says employers should have policies in place before Canada legalizes marijuana, because it could affect safety on the job.

In addition to examining this statement by Saskatchewan WCB, this article also discusses if medical marijuana is a covered medical expense under workers’ compensation.

 

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Are employees of a marijuana dispensary protected by employment standards?

With news almost every week of another marijuana dispensary raided by the police, Ontarian’s have asked, can the Ministry of Labour enforce employment standards (i.e. notice of termination, overtime, etc.) in favour of individuals who work at these criminal enterprises? In short, yes. There is simply no exemption in the Employment Standards Act (“ESA”) which exempts […]

 

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Home renos and employment agreements: How employers can avoid the money pit

With home repairs, there is risk in DIY. Similarly, employment agreements require the input of an expert. If you’re not an employment lawyer, don’t try this (i.e. drafting or revising an employment agreement) at home.

 

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Federal Budget 2017-18

On March 22, 2017, Canada’s Finance Minister Bill Morneau tabled the Liberal Government’s Federal Budget 2017, Building a Strong Middle Class, which includes various measures affecting payroll, and an abundant amount of measures that would be of interest to employers, including the extension of maternity leave to 18 months, the electronic distribution of T4 information slips, and the elimination of various tax credits.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: An employee who was dismissed for not submitting a doctor’s note in a timely fashion; a firefighter who was reinstated after being dismissed for sexually harassing a co–worker; and human rights claims, made by a former employee, that were barred by terms of a final release received on termination.

 

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Family status: The employee’s obligation under “the Code”

The recent decision of Misetich v. Value Village Stores Inc. reaffirms that family status accommodation under the Human Rights Code is a joint obligation, involving both the employee and employer.

 

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Fast food firing leads to aggravated damages

A recent BC Supreme Court decision finding a fast food employee was wrongfully dismissed and entitled to aggravated damages has been making newspaper headlines across the country. Ms. Ram had worked as a cook in various Burger King locations for 24 years, and was terminated for just cause after taking home a fish sandwich, fries and a drink at the end of her shift without paying for them. Ms. Ram’s claim was heard over a seven day trial, resulting in a lengthy decision.

 

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Business and booze: Dealing with alcohol in the workplace

The relationship between employee alcohol use and work is complex. In Ontario, there are specific legal obligations which apply, and employers must exercise caution. Without a proper understanding of their legal obligations, employers face a minefield which may unwittingly result in unwanted liability.

 

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President Trump’s new travel ban: What you need to know

On March 6, 2017, President Trump signed a new executive order (the “New Order”), implementing a new travel ban. However, unlike the original travel ban (which became effective immediately), the New Order will become effective at 12:01 am EDT, on March 16, 2017. This 10–day delay is intended to provide sufficient time for affected parties (including international airlines and government agencies) to prepare for the ban, in an attempt to avoid the same confusion caused by the original travel ban.

 

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The agenda for the 2017 Ontario Employment Law Conference is now available

Join Stringer LLP and First Reference at the Centre for Health & Safety Innovation in Mississauga on June 20, 2017 at the Ontario Employment Law Conference to Learn the Latest® on the following topics from top Ontario employment law experts: Jeremy Schwartz will discuss the increasingly important topic of structuring your work relationships with independent […]

 

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Employee motivation is the key to higher retention rates

Employee morale and employee retention go hand in hand. If employees do not feel motivated at work, they will most likely start to look for a new job elsewhere. Tracking employee morale is essential for measuring retention rates within a company. The only precise way to measure employee morale is fairly easy: ask the employees directly.

 

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Ontario Court of Appeal upholds award of $60,000 in moral damages

In a recent case, the Ontario Court of Appeal upheld a substantial award of moral damages to an employee subjected to long–term sexual harassment, after she made a formal complaint to her manager.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: How sleep and exercise may prevent the spread of harmful behavior across work and home life; a decision that may be helpful for employers who are faced with long delays in prosecutions of health and safety and other regulatory offences; a case that addresses without cause terminations and bonus payouts.

 

Genetic discrimination provisions in human rights legislation: Will Ontario be the first Canadian jurisdiction?

Canada is on its way to including provisions in human rights legislation that prevents discrimination based on a person’s genetic characteristics. The issue is that a person can experience discrimination and harassment simply because of something that may be—something that has the potential of happening. Employers must be aware that human rights legislation is in the process of evolving to include provisions to prevent this type of discrimination, and this will apply in the workplace as well.

 

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HR practitioners: The new HR mandate

The trend toward chaos and fear not only exists within the context of politics and social issues, it is also a business or an organizational issue. Albeit for entirely different reasons, businesses are nervous and looking for solutions. A survey of Canadian CEOs revealed that they are concerned about many things; herein the top worries are listed.

 

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