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Employment/Labour Standards

Termination clause update: New developments concerning benefit continuation and just cause language

We are not long into 2019 and yet one thing already seems clear – the law concerning employment contract termination clauses will continue to be the focus of a great deal of litigation in Ontario. In just the past few months alone, new decisions from the Superior Court have helped to advance the law and provide further guidance to employers on proper drafting of termination clauses.

 

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Wrongful dismissal update: Recent case is a cause for concern

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It is increasingly difficult for employment lawyers to assess an employer’s potential legal liability in connection with an employee termination.

 

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Over $3 million in adjustments following wage gap monitoring: continued need for monitoring is clear

Ontario’s Pay Equity Commission recently released results of the Wage Gap Monitoring Program 2018. And it’s clear that there is a continued need for monitoring.

 

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Is 36 months the new 24?

For a long time, the common law notice period had an “unofficial” cap of 24 months, which was generally reserved for very long-service, senior level management. In recent years, things have changed and longer notice periods are becoming the norm.

 

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The ONCA’s decision in the Uber case and the (il)legality of arbitration clauses in employment contracts

Will an arbitration clause in an independent contractor agreement always be found to be illegal, if, notwithstanding that to which the parties ostensibly agreed, the worker can later allege that he is, in fact, an “employee”?

 

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Time as an independent contractor can be considered in the calculation of severance

This case demonstrates that employers need to know that if they hire their independent contractors into a genuine “employee” position, that time they spent as an independent contractor may be calculated in establishing their right to severance.

 

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Simply complying with the ESA not enough to rebut common law presumption of entitlement to reasonable notice – ON Divisional Court

Is the sole requirement to rebut the common law presumption of termination only upon reasonable notice that the contractual termination clause comply with the ESA, or is something else required?

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with motor vehicle allowances, upcoming employment law changes and employer-provided transportation from the CRA’s perspective.

 

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Managing employer risk through employment practices liability policies

Litigation arising from employment disputes continues to be an active area of exposure for businesses. The most common claims are wrongful dismissal, harassment, or discrimination by an employer, fellow employee, or third party.

 

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Off-Key? The Boston Symphony and gender-based equality in pay

The size of an employee’s salary is often seen as an indicator of importance within an organization. Thus, when women are paid less than their male counterparts for performing similar work, it suggests that their efforts are somehow of lesser value.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with a new version of the ESA poster, per-kilometre rates for motor vehicle allowances and a summary of employment law changes in Alberta.

 

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Expanding the obligations of federal employers – Anti-harassment and violence provisions to be added to the Canada Labour Code

On October 25, 2018, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code (harassment and violence), and the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act and the Budget Implementation Act, 2017, No. 1 (the “Act”) received Royal Assent.

 

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Changements majeurs au Code canadien du travail

Le projet de loi C-86, intitulé Loi no 2 d’exécution du budget de 2018 (la « Loi »), a reçu la sanction royale le 13 décembre 2018. La Loi apporte d’importants changements touchant les milieux de travail de réglementation fédérale assujettis au Code canadien du travail, dont la plupart entreront en vigueur de manière échelonnée en 2019.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with termination clauses, 2018-2019 payroll rates and changes to the Employment Insurance Act.

 

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