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HR and Technology

Privacy considerations when organizations use “bring your own device programs”

The Privacy Commissioner of Canada, together with Offices of the Information and Privacy Commissioners of British Columbia and Alberta, created the document, Is a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Program the Right Choice for Your Organization? in 2015 that is still relevant today.

 

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Ontario amends pension legislation to address electronic beneficiary designations

While legislation existing prior to the introduction of section 30.1.1 (namely, the SLRA and Electronic Commerce Act (Ontario) (ECA)) may be reasonably interpreted to already permit electronic beneficiary designations in pension and certain other contexts, it did not contain an express provision addressing the point.

 

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Fired by a robot!

We have truly reached an age where people and robots are working together and where robots are effectively performing an HR function. HR, unlike a self-checkout or an assembly line robot, is something we normally think of as a soft, people only skill!

 

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What is the right to disconnect, and does it apply in Canada?

The right to disconnect refers to employees’ ability to disconnect from work and not engage in work-related communications while they are off-duty.

 

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Employee caused data breaches: What’s an organization to do?

Data and privacy breaches caused by hacking and social engineering fraud are here to stay. Once considered an emerging risk, cyber is now a reality facing every organization.

 

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Whose device is it anyway?

Many workplaces have adapted to the fluid use of technology and encourage their employees to use their own technology at work through bring your own device (BYOD) policies.

 

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Rise of the machines in the workplace

Is your workplace about to be automated? A recent study by McKinsey & Company suggests that about half of the activities (not jobs) carried out by workers could be automated right now with currently available technologies.

 

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Costs and legal tech

At SpringLaw we love legal tech and consequently a few recent cost decisions have caught our eye. In both Cass v. 1410088 Ontario Inc. (“Cass”) and Drummond v. The Cadillac Fairview Corp. Ltd. (“Drummond”) justices of the Ontario Superior Court made comments about artificial intelligence and legal research.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with working remotely, 2019 payroll rates and random drug and alcohol testing.

 

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No skirting around the issue: Gender identity and sexual orientation discrimination appear to be on the rise

Employers who fail to take action when there are complaints of unlawful discrimination in the workplace are exposing themselves to serious potential liability, both from a financial and a reputational perspective.

 

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Even robots are a little bit racist: Al bias in recruitment

How would you like to perform only the most high-level and uniquely human elements of your job? Are your skills really best utilized on data entry, rote memorization and pushing paper? Artificial Intelligence (AI) promises to delegate all the drudgery of your job to machines while freeing you up to mingle with clients on the golf course and answer phone calls from your private yacht in the Adriatic Sea.

 

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Secretly recorded conversations – the collision of “technification” and mistrust in the workplace

While I would never have been able to predict at the time I started practicing employment law that I’d be writing about and advising clients on the risks associated with secret recordings in the workplace, it is a reality that is now a regular part of the modern workplace.

 

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Privacy Commissioner of Canada creates draft guidance document outlining inappropriate data practices and no-go zones

On September 28, 2017, the Privacy Commissioner of Canada created a draft guidance document providing clarification on inappropriate data practices, specifically focusing on subsection 5(3) of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA). This provision is entitled, “Appropriate purposes”, and states that, “an organization may collect, use or disclose personal information only for purposes that a reasonable person would consider are appropriate in the circumstances”.

 

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Tips for recruiting online

While it may be tempting to view the web as a wild west free-for-all, it is important to remember that the law still very much applies.

 

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Proposed privacy breach of security safeguards under PIPEDA

Organizations that have control over an individual’s personal information are recommended to become familiar with the proposed requirements so that they are prepared to respond to the changes.

 

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