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Privacy and Security

Artificial Intelligence (AI) in recruiting

artificial intelligence

Stories about artificial intelligence (AI) stealing our jobs and robots going rogue have been in our collective consciousness for years. Elon Musk has also sounded the alarm bells’, calling AI the “biggest risk we face as a civilization”. While he may know a few things I don’t, I can’t say that I agree. Always one to embrace technology, I think AI has great potential to be used by businesses in the HR space, such as to make hiring practices more efficient and more fair.

 

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Is the rule of law at risk in Ontario?

Rule of law

Recently I concluded that the rule of law no longer applies in many Ontario workplaces. The epiphany hit me when I was meeting with the Managing Director of a boutique law firm.

 

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Sexual harassment house of cards

Another week, another list of public allegations of sexual abuse, sexual assault and sexual harassment against high profile men in the entertainment industry, politics and beyond. The onslaught of allegations, which began in earnest with the allegations against Harvey Weinstein, followed soon after by allegations against what appears to be almost every other man in Hollywood, created a #MeToo movement indicating that it is a rare occurrence for a woman to have not been abused or harassed, with many instances work-related.

 

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Privacy Commissioner of Canada creates draft guidance document outlining inappropriate data practices and no-go zones

On September 28, 2017, the Privacy Commissioner of Canada created a draft guidance document providing clarification on inappropriate data practices, specifically focusing on subsection 5(3) of the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA). This provision is entitled, “Appropriate purposes”, and states that, “an organization may collect, use or disclose personal information only for purposes that a reasonable person would consider are appropriate in the circumstances”.

 

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The legalities of criminal, credit and medical checks in HR

Many employers requesting personal information related to criminal, credit or medical circumstances may consider the requests to be legitimate in creating or maintaining the working relationship. However, they should be careful what they wish for.

 

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Tips for recruiting online

While it may be tempting to view the web as a wild west free-for-all, it is important to remember that the law still very much applies.

 

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Proposed privacy breach of security safeguards under PIPEDA

Organizations that have control over an individual’s personal information are recommended to become familiar with the proposed requirements so that they are prepared to respond to the changes.

 

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Privacy information: Cookieless identification and tracking of devices

On August 21, 2017, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada released an informative piece regarding cookieless identification and tracking of devices.

 

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Dishonesty in hiring process constitutes cause for dismissal

A recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has confirmed that, in certain scenarios, an employee’s dishonesty in the hiring process will constitute cause for dismissal. In this case, the plaintiff’s claim for wrongful termination was dismissed when the court found that the plaintiff’s omission on a security questionnaire amounted to dishonesty that went to the core of the employment relationship and was irreconcilable with sustained employment.

 

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PHIPA fines in the workplace

This spring the largest penalty to date was issued under Ontario’s Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA). A social work student was convicted of accessing personal health information without authorization, and ordered pay a $20,000 fine and a $5,000 victim fine surcharge.

 

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Video cameras in the workplace – The Vigi Santé Ltée decision: The Court of Appeal weighs in

The presence of video cameras in the workplace, as well as other measures of surveillance put in place by employers, have generated considerable commentary in recent years in Quebec. Administrative and civil tribunals are increasingly called upon to rule on the legality of these measures which are increasingly accessible to employers, as well as to assess their probative value in the context of the administration of evidence.

 

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Caméras vidéo en milieu de travail – L’arrêt Vigi Santé Ltée : La cour d’appel se prononce

La présence de caméras vidéo en milieu de travail, ainsi que d’autres mesures de surveillance mises en place par un employeur, font couler beaucoup d’encre depuis quelques années au Québec. En effet, les tribunaux administratifs et civils sont de plus en plus appelés à se prononcer sur la légalité de ces mesures dorénavant accessibles aux employeurs, ainsi qu’à en évaluer la force probante dans un contexte d’administration de la preuve.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: a warning from the Privacy Commissioner not to reuse passwords, a company that contravened privacy law by releasing the results of an employee’s drug test and Alberta’s investigation of serious workplace health and safety incidents.

 

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Privacy Commissioner provides some tips for businesses regarding passwords

The Privacy Commissioner Canada has recently released some tips for mitigating risk to businesses involving passwords. One main problem is that individuals use the same password for multiple accounts – this puts them at a much higher risk of experiencing a breach.

 

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Departing employees gone rogue

The business consequences of departing employees gone rogue were recently highlighted in Prim8 Group Inc. v Tisi. In that case, an officer and director of Prim8 Group Inc. (Tisi) resigned from his employment to set up a competing business. Two days before his resignation, Tisi removed electronic equipment from Prim8’s premises, some of which contained proprietary information, and refused to return it. Shortly thereafter, another employee resigned from Prim8 without notice to join Tisi’s competing business.

 

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