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business travel

Overtime entitlement: Employee travel

Under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 and Ontario Regulation 285/01, “work” is deemed to be performed when an employee is travelling on business, even if that time is non-productive and outside normal business hours. Here are some ways to minimize that liability.

 

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Business travel: A review of NEXUS program eligibility

The NEXUS program is a joint initiative of United States Customs and Border Protection and the Canada Border Services Agency, which enables pre-approved, low-risk travellers to receive expedited entry when travelling to the United States or Canada.  Unfortunately, not everyone will be in a position to satisfy the NEXUS eligibility criteria. 

 

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Government of Canada announces 10-year biometric passport for Canadians

On July 2, 2013, the Citizenship, Immigration and Multiculturalism Minister (the “Minister”) announced that 10-year ePassports, also known as biometric passports, will now be available to Canadian citizens. The Minister also announced that Citizenship and Immigration Canada (“CIC”) would immediately assume primary responsibility for Passport Canada, which had previously been part of the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade.

 

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Travelling for business – not all fun and games!

How often do your employees travel? If your answer is: “Not that often,” you may not have considered implementing a policy regarding work travel. More importantly, you may not have considered whether you are liable if something happens to a worker while they are travelling. Do you know how the new changes to Ontario’s Occupational Health and Safety Act affect work travel and your employees?

 

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Safety and security for business travellers: a legal and moral imperative for Canadian employers, part 2

In some cases, business leaders fail to recognize that employee travel falls within the physical scope of workplace activities. In other cases, decision-makers believe that only those travelling to international high-risk destinations require any type of security protection. In most organizations, there is also a gap in knowledge when it comes to travel security, contributing to a lack of risk awareness and fragmented ownership of the function within the organization.

 

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Safety and security for business travellers: a legal and moral imperative for Canadian employers

When it comes to employee travel, the risk landscape is changing for Canadian employers. The nature and extent of security and safety risks faced by today’s business traveller are expanding, and conditions on the ground for international travellers are becoming more unpredictable. In parallel with these changes, we are witnessing a tidal wave of new occupational health and safety statutes and regulations aimed at preventing work-related violence, including recent examples in Ontario, Manitoba and Newfoundland.

 

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Canada-U.S. Beyond the Border Action Plan proposes immigration-related initiatives

On December 7, 2011, US President Obama and Canada’s Prime Minister Harper released their Beyond the Border Action Plan, which discusses their shared vision for perimeter security. In furtherance of this objective, the plan proposes several immigration-related initiatives.

 

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Duty of care and sending employees abroad: How much do organizations need to care?

More and more organizations are asking the question: “What are the responsibilities associated with managing a travelling workforce?” This question has been increasingly relevant as of late, with a number of Canadian companies taking notice of the recent events in Egypt, Libya, and Japan.

 

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