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BYOD

BYOD program in the workplace: Some considerations

As an employer, you may be contemplating creating a bring your own device program in the workplace. There are several advantages to having such a program—companies can save a great deal of money and make employees happy by allowing devices in the workplace. However, there are significant concerns that need to be addressed if this is the direction the company wishes to take.

 

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Top four tech tips for terminations

As technology continues to overhaul the workplace and drive change, what remains the same is the emotional uncertainty of termination. Neither the employee, nor the person tasked with conducting the termination, enjoy that awkward meeting.

 

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Negotiating BYOD cell phones at termination

You bring the employee into the boardroom, have an awkward 5 minute discussion about restructuring and the elimination of her role, thank her for her years of service, hand her the termination package with the various settlement package details, request that she returns all company property and offer to help her pack her personal items.

Then, she asks about her cell phone.  Can she keep the phone?  Can she keep the phone number? 

 

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Ontario Privacy Commissioner releases BYOD policy whitepaper

Employees have taken work home with them on laptops, portable media and via email for many years. Since the advent of the smartphone, however, the scale of the practice has expanded dramatically, and data is now more likely in workers’ pockets or purses than on their desks at home.

 

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BYOD: is personal information visible over corporate networks?

Employers are increasingly drafting and implementing bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies for their employees. And they should be, since employees are increasingly using their personal digital devices—phones, tablets, laptops—to perform work, both in and out of the workplace. But employees may have trouble trusting their employers to stay out of their personal information…

 

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The risks of BYOD policy

In the “old” days, employees took whatever their employers gave them when it came to cellphones or personal digital assistants. However, the popularity of devices such as Apple and Android smartphones prompted a backlash from staff demanding to use their product of choice. Many employers, seeing a way to reduce costs, invited employees to “bring your own device”…

 

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BYOD trend poses immense challenges for organizations

No, employees aren’t bringing their own alcoholic drinks to work, but they are bringing in their own mobile devices and expecting to use them with their employers’ networks. What does that mean? Well, chances are several (if not many) of a given organization’s employees have personal smartphones or tablet computers, and they probably want to use them to perform work tasks.

 

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