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certification

Certification and recertification requirements change for federally regulated workplaces beginning June 22, 2017

Employers in unionized workplaces are recommended to become familiar with the changes made by Bill C-4, An Act to amend the Canada Labour Code, the Parliamentary Employment and Staff Relations Act, the Public Service Labour Relations Act and the Income Tax Ac and take a careful look at the transitional provisions in Bill C-4 in the case where there is an existing application with the Board.

 

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Five regulated or specialized occupations: How to obtain your professional designation or recognition

Economic conditions in Canada have steadily improved, while the unemployment rate continues to drop. Many Canadians are re-entering the labour force after lengthy hiatuses as companies are hiring and profit sheets are back in the black. There are several regulated or specialized occupations – those controlled by a professional association or provincial and/or federal law – that have a positive outlook. About 20 percent of all jobs in Canada are regulated. Some require advanced education and licensure, while others require only provincial certification. Here are highlights from five of those careers and information on getting started.

 

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Certifying Canada’s national sport, the next generation

The Canadian Hockey League Players’ Association has applied to seek certification as a bargaining agent for the Cape Breton Screaming Eagles players. It criticizes the working standards for the junior players including alleged violations of labour, pension and employment rules and states that it is looking for minimum wage for the teams.

 

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To be or not to be an employer…

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The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees’ successful application for certification by the Nova Scotia Labour Board basically creates a new classification of worker, according to the president of Egg Films Inc. It is a classification composed of technicians employed on a casual basis for particular productions. Egg Films may ask the Nova Scotia Supreme Court for a judicial review.

 

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Overtime class action certification order slammed by Court of Appeal

Ontario’s Court of Appeal has just decided that the overtime pay claims of a group of front-line supervisors at Canadian National Railway lacked commonality; hence, overturning a lower court decision that had certified a “misclassification” overtime class action against CN. The supervisors claim CN excluded them from overtime pay by calling them “managers” when they were not.

 

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Slaw: Labour mobility and the legal profession

The Agreement on Internal Trade mandates that any worker certified, licensed, registered or officially recognized in one province or territory, upon application, will be certified, licensed, registered or officially recognized for that same occupation by any other province or territory without the worker being required to undertake any material additional requirements, such as education, training, examination or assessments.

However, provinces and territories have the right to maintain specific occupational standards and can adopt exceptions to certification requirements based on legitimate objectives. The legal profession is one of the occupations that needs to be recognized among the provinces and territories, but is also one of the professions with exceptions to full labour mobility in Canada.

Read the whole article on Slaw.ca.

 

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