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civil action

Slaw: Superior court of justice certifies a class action for wrongful dismissal against IQT

On January 2, 2014 Justice Perell of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice certified a class proceeding by 527 wrongfully terminated employees led by Bob Brigaitis and Cindy Rupert against their now bankrupt employer, IQT Solutions and the officers, directors, shareholders…

 

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Two kicks at the can: Worker allowed to re-litigate WSIB accommodation dispute at the Human Rights Tribunal

Most employers are likely familiar with the WSIB return to work process which often involves a WSIB employee attending at the workplace for the purpose of identifying suitable and sustainable work for the injured worker. In circumstances where there is a dispute about whether a position is suitable and/or available, the WSIB will examine the circumstances and make a written decision. The worker and the employer have the right to appeal an adverse decision initially to the WSIB Appeals Branch and ultimately to the independent Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal.

 

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Ontario Human Rights Tribunal opening the door to duplicative litigation?

Since the Supreme Court decision in British Columbia (Workers’ Compensation Board) v. Figliola (“Figliola”), the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario (the “Tribunal”) has taken a more narrow approach to its jurisdiction to hear applications where another tribunal has dealt with the same or similar issues. However, recent case law suggests that the Tribunal is moving away from the more narrow Interpretation of its jurisdiction that was laid out in Figliola.

 

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Jail for lying in a civil action?

Clearly, if a court finds that one party has been dishonest, it will have serious negative repercussions with respect to their chances of success. It can also result in a cost award against them. The question for today, however, is whether it is appropriate to also find parties who lie during the litigation process in contempt, and if so, what the appropriate penalty should be.

 

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