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constructive dismissal

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: a repeal of an increase in OAS age of eligibility, an employer’s refusal to pay bonus not amounting to constructive dismissal and the determination that an employee’s cessation of LTD benefits couldn’t advance by way of action.

 

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Constructive dismissal? A question of interpretation

The employee in this case acted hastily, and the employer prevailed against his constructive dismissal claim. However, the employer may have avoided the time and expense of litigation if the bonus agreement had contained clear, concise language.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: Repeal of CPP Social Insurance Numbers Regulations and amendments; whether less-than-ideal working conditions can result in a constructive dismissal circumstance; and an employee’s reinstatement after serious misconduct.

 

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Constructive dismissal and employer prestige

In 2016, the Court of Appeal of Quebec has clarified that reduced employer prestige cannot, in itself, serve as grounds for constructive dismissal in the specific context of business acquisitions.

 

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Le congédiement déguisé et employeur prestige

En 2016, la Cour d’appel du Québec a conclu que, dans le contexte de l’aliénation d’une entreprise, le fait pour un employé de passer à un employeur moins prestigieux ne peut, en soi, constituer un congédiement déguisé.

 

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Bore out: Workplace boredom and employer liability

Despite workplace boredom being a mundane reality of some working lives, it may also be the catalyst for more serious workplace concerns. At the extreme, in limited circumstances, boredom could even form the basis for constructive dismissal.

 

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An employer’s right when it comes to imposing changes to the employment relationship

At its very core, the employment contract is a very simple one: an individual agrees to work, and the employer agrees to pay them for their effort. Of course, if everything were that simple, then employment lawyers, like myself, would not have very much to do. In addition to the plethora of other issues that can arise, we are often consulted by employers and employees in relation to proposed changes to the contract of employment. The question then becomes: what is an employer’s right to impose changes to the employment relationship/agreement?

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: a case where an employee who was told to, “Get out!” constituted constructive dismissal; a case that addresses the question of whether an employer can restructure the workplace in good faith without constructively dismissing an employee; and a case that looks at whether federally-regulated employees can be terminated without cause.

 

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Refusing to relocate: Just cause for dismissal?

It is not uncommon for an organization to move their offices, or to “transfer” an employee from one location to another. Sometimes, the move is across the street, while other moves are across the country or farther. What happens if an employee refuses to relocate?

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: a case where an employee was given the ultimatum to take a demotion or go; a case where an employee used the OHSA’s work refusal provisions to avoid work assignments he did not like; and an inquiry of whether an employer confers a benefit to an employee by paying premiums with respect to an employee assistance program.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with three cases: One case looks at the “suitability test” to establish whether the employer acted in good faith; the second case looks at constructive dismissal; and the third case addresses the question of whether employers can terminate disobedient employees for cause.

 

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Court finds that employer telling employee to “get out” constitutes dismissal

Termination of an employment relationship can come in many forms; some apparent and some not so. In the latter case, it often falls to a court to determine whether an employer’s actions constitute dismissal or constructive dismissal. This was the issue faced by Justice Lack in the recent decision of Sweeting v Mok.

 

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Terminated: (Summary) judgment day

When the T-1000 came from the future to destroy John Connor, Arnie made sure he was stopped in his tracks. While employers who have to date relied upon prohibitive time and costs to deter ex-employee claims might not face the wrath that Skynet did, given the recent decision of Cloutier v. Q Residential LP Corp (Cloutier), 2015 ONSC 4431 (CanLII), a rethinking of such approaches may be required.

 

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Top 10 employment law stories of 2015

Seasons change; employment laws change and the last four seasons saw many changes to Ontario’s employment laws. In fact, 2015 will be known as the year the Kathleen Wynne government started implementing its rather ambitious employment law agenda… changes were made to a number of laws including the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, the Employment Standards Act, and the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

 

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Danger ahead: Beware of changes to employment agreements

To appreciate the dangers of varying employment terms, we must start with the foundations of contract law. First, a contract requires that each party receive a benefit (consideration). Second, if the parties agree to a variation of contract, but consideration is not received by both parties, Courts will consider the new contract an “unenforceable unilateral variation”. Third…

 

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