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Email etiquette: What Ontario can learn from France

The capacity to send and receive email on smart phone devices and laptops has fundamentally altered the working lives of many. The notion of the ‘9 to 5’ job has, in many industries, become a thing of the past. Our use of email has profoundly altered how and when we work: it has blurred the distinction between work and home lives; it has altered our view of what is appropriate communication and our expectation of how quickly people should respond. In many ways, it has simultaneously increased the volume of workplace communications and dramatically accelerated the pace at which it occurs.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

Three of the most popular articles on HRinfodesk this week deal with a worker’s right of action; WSIB mental health stress test; and, employer liability under Canadian Anti-Spam Legislation.

 

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BYOD: is personal information visible over corporate networks?

Employers are increasingly drafting and implementing bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies for their employees. And they should be, since employees are increasingly using their personal digital devices—phones, tablets, laptops—to perform work, both in and out of the workplace. But employees may have trouble trusting their employers to stay out of their personal information…

 

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‘Invitation to harass?’

By now, most of us have heard about a controversial decision of the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench in which Justice Robert Dewar sentenced a man found guilty of sexual assault to a two year conditional sentence, allowing him to remain free in the community and avoid any jail time.

 

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Workplace communication and the real world: email features for the quick-tempered and impulsive

You’ve written an email that says some things you might be better off saying in person—or not at all—right? Like when you wanted to tell off a co-worker—or supervisor—about taking credit for your work, or putting you down in front of the boss, or just for generally being a jerk. Maybe you were caught up in the anger of the moment—you let your temper get the best of you—or maybe you were just a bit—or a lot—drunk. And maybe you hit that “Send” button, and maybe you reconsidered before it was too late. I don’t like to imagine the result of sending such a message.

 

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