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Employee resignation

The thin legal line: Resignation vs termination #learnthelatest

Has an employee who hands over his keys and company cell phone to his employer and declares “I’m done” resigned their employment? The Newfoundland and Labrador Court of Appeal has said that, in at least one case, the answer is no.

 

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Don’t accept a resignation too quickly

Imagine that you find yourself in a heated argument with one of your employees and, having apparently had enough, the employee announced that he is fed up and is done with the company. He then handed you his pass card and stormed out of the office. Can you proceed on the basis that he has resigned?

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: Employee background checks; employee resignations; and current and upcoming minimum wage.

 

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When a resignation isn’t really a resignation

How do you know when an employee has quit their job? It may seem like a simple question, but the answer recently eluded an Ontario employer, who improperly took an employee’s apparent resignation at face value.

 

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Resignation: Best practices for employers

Cessation of an employee’s employment can happen by way of termination of employment by the employer or resignation by the employee. In the case of a voluntary resignation, while the employer may feel as though it is losing a beneficial employee, the upside is that the employer is not liable for the dreadful “reasonable notice of termination”. This blog discusses some of the best practices for employers when handling a resignation.

 

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Wrongful resignation: Revisiting the employee obligation to provide reasonable notice

The outcome in the following case is another example of why employers should think twice prior to launching wrongful resignation claims.

 

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Giving your ‘two weeks’: Jesso and what constitutes reasonable notice for resignation

The question of ‘what constitutes reasonable notice’ is one of the most frequently litigated issues in employment law. There are numerous decisions from every level of court in Ontario which discuss the obligations of an employer to provide a reasonable period of notice to dismissed employees. However, it is a relatively rare occurrence that the Court deals with the inverse – the reasonable period of notice due to an employer by an employee who resigns. While most of us are familiar with the old adage of giving your ‘two weeks’ notice, the recent decision in Gagnon may call into question the sufficiency of such short notice.

 

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Resignation regrets: Employee’s failure to provide reasonable notice of departure costs him $56,116.11

When employers think of reasonable notice, they tend to be concerned with whether sufficient notice of dismissal is provided by the employer to the employee. However, an important subject that garners far less attention is what notice a departing employee must provide to the employer.

 

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Danger of fixed term contract avoided

The recent decision in Tossonian v. Cynphany Diamonds Inc. highlights the importance for both employees and employers to clearly specify the fundamental terms of an employment contract in writing including the “term” of the contract.

 

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How much notice of resignation must an employee provide?

It is a commonly held belief that employees must provide two weeks’ notice when they resign from their employment. However, this blanket statement does not necessarily reflect the applicable legal requirements. While two weeks’ notice is appropriate in many cases, some employees may be required to provide less notice, and other employees may be required […]

 

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