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Evidence and credibility at the HRTO

Age is one of the protected grounds under Ontario’s Human Rights Code. Like all jurisdictions credible evidence, whether documentary or witness testimony, is needed for either side to support their version of facts.

 

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Good Friday, Easter and Passover in 2019

Good Friday and Easter Sunday coincide with the Jewish observance of Passover in 2019.

 

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Critical work injuries – Ensure its prevention

Without the proper safe work practices, safety policies are ineffective to protect workers in the workplace.

 

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Employee caused data breaches: What’s an organization to do?

Data and privacy breaches caused by hacking and social engineering fraud are here to stay. Once considered an emerging risk, cyber is now a reality facing every organization.

 

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How US federal cannabis legalization would affect US immigration laws

During the 115th United States Congress, several Bills were introduced to legalize marijuana at the federal level. The Bills that received the most attention were:

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with employment standards changes, labour standards changes and other employment law related acts impacted by under Bill 66, the Restoring Ontario’s Competitiveness Act, 2019.

 

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Does a 4-day work week work for your business?

For each individual business, it will depend on whether a 4-day work week means reducing hours, or simply compacting the same hours into less time. Some research has shown that workplaces can maintain the same level of productivity with staff working 32 hours a week as they do with teams working a full 40 hours.

 

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Refuse, snooze & lose

For workplaces that operate on shift work, dealing with employee refusals to change shifts (especially to night shift) happens all too often.

 

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Mass termination and working notice requirements clarified by Ontario Court of Appeal

A recent decision of the Ontario Court of Appeal has clarified employers’ notice obligations in the event of business closure, particularly with respect to mass termination notice requirements under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (the “ESA”) and “working notice” more broadly.

 

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Duty to accommodate may be triggered even when employee does not request accommodation

As we all know, employers are required to accommodate individuals to the point of “undue hardship” where the need for accommodation relates to a ground protected by human rights legislation, such as disability.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with and EI claim and Service Canada’s opinion, metal stress injuries at work and labour relations changes under Bill 66.

 

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Let’s talk ergonomics!

You may be scratching your head at our title. What’s ergonomics got to do with law? Maybe even asking, what the heck is ergonomics? Well in this post we will answer both of those questions and tell you why workplace ergonomics should be on the radar of employees and employers alike.

 

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Are employees entitled to receive damages for variable compensation during the reasonable notice period?

Some employees receive a large percentage of their total remuneration in variable compensation. A much litigated issue is whether the employer is required to pay variable compensation to a terminated employee during the applicable notice period and if so how is this compensation calculated.

 

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R v Jarvis: the Supreme Court of Canada clarifies the interpretation of “reasonable expectation of privacy” in the context of section 162(1) of the Criminal Code of Canada

On February 14, 2019, the Supreme Court of Canada made a landmark decision in R v Jarvis with its interpretation of the meaning of “reasonable expectation of privacy” in the context of section 162(1) of the Criminal Code of Canada involving a criminal offence of voyeurism.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with the 2019-20 Budget, privacy guidelines in Alberta for managing emails and what happens when an employer overpays an employee by mistake.

 

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