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News and Discussions on Payroll, HR & Employment Law

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engagement

Does management limit engagement?

“Disengagement is not an employee problem. It is a hangover from the Industrial Age that invented a middle tier in companies so useless and intrusive that a cartoon strip called Dilbert is the best picture we have of how it functions.” Those are the words of author Chuck Blakeman. What do you think?

 

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HR’s role in Apple’s success

What is it about the Apple Store that’s just so great? Is it the super chic product line? The fact that you can tinker with just about anything in there? The super modern layout and design? All of those things are neat, sure, but I’d argue there’s something more—something you may not have paid as much attention to…

 

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The cost of measurement

Once you have a reputation as a “measurement guy” you get a lot of speaking requests. Recently I was asked to speak on a wellness topic. In the end I declined because even though the measurement aspects of the question were clear, I did not have the knowledge of the topic to deliver well. The request got me thinking about the costs of measurement. Often this is an area that is not considered when people get into the question of finding data.

 

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Do we place too much emphasis on stress at work?

Seventy-three percent of working Canadians experience almost daily stress in their jobs, according to a recent study by Statistics Canada. That’s approximately 10 million people, or nearly one-third of Canada’s population. More than one-quarter of workers say their job is “quite a bit” or “extremely” stressful; close to half say they experience “a bit” of stress. But where is all the stress coming from, and is it affecting workers’ productivity?

Morever, should employers be aiming for stress-free workplaces?

 

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How do you promote workplace health and safety?

When Benjamin Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”, it turns out he was talking about fire safety at a time when fire departments and other prevention measures didn’t exist.

 

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