First Reference company logo

First Reference Talks

News and Discussions on Payroll, HR & Employment Law

decorative image

genetic testing

Genetic discrimination provisions in human rights legislation: Will Ontario be the first Canadian jurisdiction?

Canada is on its way to including provisions in human rights legislation that prevents discrimination based on a person’s genetic characteristics. The issue is that a person can experience discrimination and harassment simply because of something that may be—something that has the potential of happening. Employers must be aware that human rights legislation is in the process of evolving to include provisions to prevent this type of discrimination, and this will apply in the workplace as well.

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

It’s in our DNA: Bill S-201 and genetic discrimination

When dealing with requests for accommodation, employee absenteeism and other medical circumstances, employers are routinely faced with the challenge of balancing employee privacy interests against the operational interests of the business when determining how much medical information and what kind of medical information employers can request. The analysis typically centres on the issue of what is reasonable in the circumstances, with diagnostic information being considered to be a clear delineation point as to what employers may request and not request. At the Canadian Senate in January, the question of the protection personal health information took on a new angle, centering around an individual’s right to privacy in respect of their personal genetic information.

 

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

2016 – Looking forward, looking back

As the first blog post of the year, I thought it apt to first wish everyone a very happy, healthy and prosperous New Year and second, to take the opportunity to take a quick look back and a long look forward at what might be coming down the road this year in human resources policy.

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

First GINA lawsuit filed

It was recently brought to my attention that last April, several US news sources reported that the first Genetic Information Non-discrimination Act (GINA) case has been filed with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities.

 

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

Genetic discrimination in the workplace

I first wrote about genetic discrimination in the workplace in August of 2004. At that time, I compared it to the movie Gattaca, in which a man tries to hide his “imperfect” genetic makeup so that he can enjoy a way of life and secure a job reserved for people without “flawed” genes. Although Gattaca is science fiction, the movie’s plot is not that remote from present-day reality.

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,