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Human Resources

Summarizing WSIB’s proposed Rate Framework, part 2

This blog is part two of a three-part series which examines the proposed fundamental changes to WSIB’s method of business classification and application of premium rates. Part one of this series explored how WSIB proposes to re-categorize Ontario businesses into 34 industries, based solely on “business activity”.

 

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Pay equity: Employer requirements

Pay Equity is a requirement on Ontario employers to ensure that workers are paid equally for work of equal value, regardless of their gender. The requirement on employers arises out of the Pay Equity Act, which was passed by the Ontario Government in 1987 and became effective January 1, 1988; there was an amendment to this Act in 1993 as well.

 

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Presenteeism in the workplace

Presenteeism results in productivity loss, workplace epidemics, or poor health and exhaustion, which can lead to higher absenteeism for longer periods or accidents. Whether it is a physical or mental ailment, employees should be staying home when they are unable to be present at work. Being physically at work is different than being present at work. It is one thing to show up at work; it’s another thing to be actually productive while at work.

 

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New Liberal Government plans to keep best and brightest and support persons with disabilities in Nova Scotia

The newly elected Liberal government platform states that businesses need workers, and recent graduates and skilled workers need experience. The Liberal government states that it will support young graduates to develop the necessary skills and gain experience in their fields and develop an Accessibility for Nova Scotians with Disabilities Act.

 

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Most-viewed articles this week on HRinfodesk

Employee constructively dismissed, but no damages awarded because of failure to mitigate The Ontario Superior Court of Justice just decided that although an employee was constructively dismissed when he was suddenly “laid off,” the employer did not owe the employee any damages because he failed to mitigate his loss. New high-water mark for punitive damages […]

 

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Most-viewed articles this week on HRinfodesk

Emergency response plans in the workplace: A recent HRinfodesk poll asked readers if they have an emergency response plan at their workplace. Out of 146 respondents, 105 respondents (72 percent) said they do… Stepping up employment standards enforcement and education: The province of Alberta is proceeding on plans to step up employment standards enforcement. These […]

 

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Most-viewed articles this week on HRinfodesk

The death knell for human resources? A recent article in the Globe and Mail’s careers section caused me to do a triple-take. It quoted studies indicating that the more an organization seeks to be undiscriminating and merit-based in its employment practices, the less likely it is to achieve those objectives. (In PDF) Just cause not […]

 

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Most-viewed articles this week on HRinfodesk

Connecting to co-workers and employer on social media Our last HRinfodesk poll asked readers if they connect with their boss or any of their co-workers on any social media platform. According to poll results, the majority said they don’t or never will. New mandatory health and safety workplace poster Under the Ontario Occupational Health and […]

 

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Most-viewed articles this week on HRinfodesk

The war is over (and you’re fired)! In the history of questionable dismissals of employees, the saga of journalist Edward Kennedy has to rank near the top of the list. Over 65 years after his firing, his former employer has apologized. (In PDF) Is excessive Internet use time theft? It is now common for employees […]

 

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Organizational behaviour Part I: what is it and why is it important for employers?

Organizational behaviour has been defined as the field of study that investigates the impact that individuals, groups and structures have on behaviour within organizations, particularly workplaces, in order to improve the organization’s effectiveness. But is it important for employers to understand organizational behaviour?

 

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Has your workplace experienced an outbreak of the ‘World Cup Flu’?

Are your employees suffering from the “World Cup Flu”? Are you finding that there is an unusually high rate of absenteeism in your office these days?

 

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Dismissing an employee for cause – are reasons required?

The question of whether an employer should give reasons at the time of dismissal is an important one in employment law…

 

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Competing with former employers

The Ontario Superior Court re-affirmed the freedom of employees to leave their employer and set up a competitive business.

 

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Hours of work: What counts as ‘work’ in the Blackberry era?

I lifted that title from a presentation at the recent Davis LLP employment law update, because I don’t think I need to improve on it. The question seems simple, but I’m certain that it has got many employers and human resources departments wishing the handy devices had never been invented! (Okay, maybe not that confused.)

 

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Can employers prevent workplace suicide?

I was recently reading an issue of SafetyNewsAlert, which indicated that there were over 20 attempted suicides over one year in a single Chinese technology factory—one that manufactures products for Apple, including the iPad, among other things. Out of the 20 attempts, 9 suicides were successful within a period of five months. According to the article, questions are being raised about the sustainability of China’s manufacturing model, which relies on long hours from its workers. Typical workweeks include seven days of twelve hours.

 

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