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Top 3 mistakes of executives upon termination

Whether a frontline employee on an hourly wage or a senior salaried executive with extensive and complicated variable compensation, there is an equally shared truth upon termination of employment:  it hurts, and you are now required to negotiate your termination package in the midst of emotional and financial turmoil.

 

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Can you force an employee to provide proof of their religion or their religious beliefs?

Can you force an employee to provide proof of their religion or their religious beliefs? The issue of one’s religion or religious beliefs will only be relevant in the employment context when there is a request for accommodation. Typically…

 

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Customer contacts on LinkedIn = Property of the employer

Ever since the days that employment law was referred to as “master and servant” law, employees have owed various common-law duties and, for some employees, fiduciary obligations to their employer. These obligations take many forms, but key is that an employee cannot misappropriate an employer’s confidential or proprietary information. In the days before social media, this was fairly easy to describe. Generally speaking, an employee could not print or email to himself a copy of the employer’s customer list, and then use that list to compete against the employer. But what if that customer list is not a document, but is kept on a LinkedIn page?

 

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Your organization needs a social media policy

More than 19 million Canadians check Facebook at least once per month and 14 million check every day. There are more than 200 million active users of Twitter, and around 400 million tweets sent daily. LinkedIn boasts 8 million Canadian users. These stats confirm what you probably already know: your employees are on social media. They are likely on social media multiple times a day, which means that they are likely using social media at work.

 

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Disruption in talent acquisition (recruitment) – three little secrets

It’s an exciting time in the human capital business… and more specifically, in the business of both acquiring the right talent, and in driving effectiveness of that talent once they cross the threshold of your organization’s door as an employee.

 

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Beautiful People job site, hiring someone based purely on their looks

Recently, several posts on LinkedIn made mention of the fact that Beautifulpeople.com, a dating website, is launching a recruiting service for employers. Almost immediately, the question was raised: can employers hire based on looks?

 

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Can employers protect business contacts acquired by employees’ use of social media?

Consider this: you have encouraged your employee to use online social media during work time to build professional contacts to grow your business. The employee goes ahead and invests time during the workday visiting sites like Linkedin, Twitter and Facebook. This strategy proves to be positive; the contacts have been part of the business growth you have experienced. Then, your employee wants to leave the company and move on to another job. Can you, as the employer, ask for the contact information the employee accumulated during his or her employment?

 

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Social networking and Internet abuse in the workplace – Learn the latest

We’ve written plenty on First Reference Talks about the significant effects—both negative and positive—that online social networking can have on workplaces. Whether its Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube, news or entertainment blogs or what-have-you, employees are using social media, and increasingly they’re doing it on your time. Employers should be aware of the potential value they can derive from social media, as well as the potential risks.

 

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Social media = time management? (Part 2)

Social media are new, and their value is not entirely clear, especially to businesses that are doing just fine as they are, thank you very much. Heck, it’s even possible that blogs, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and other Web 2.0 and social networking services will turn out to be passing fads, in which case, maybe companies that ignore them will have the last laugh on the matter. I don’t know about that, but I will say this: the generation that grew up on the Internet and began to enter the labour market over the last decade is unlikely to want to shift to a way of doing things that doesn’t involve the Internet and its associated applications and gadgets. And their children—well, who can say how connected they’ll be. It would take an extremely authoritarian approach to return to the workplace of our parents, and likely an approach that looks backward rather than ahead. But enough of prediction, let’s talk about some interesting stuff!

 

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Is social media recruiting a discrimination land mine?

Here’s a question about an issue that is becoming increasingly relevant:

By using social networking sites—such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn—to search for and recruit employees, are employers discriminating against groups that are less likely to use those services?

 

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