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mental health

Furry friends at work, should pets be part of your office culture?

Are you thinking it would be out of this world for you to bring your pets to work? Think again—Companies today are slowly hopping on board to this idea.

 

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An employer’s duty to inquire into mental illness

Accommodating a mental illness does not only benefit the employee, but it also makes good business sense. Enabling employees with mental illness to access support can increase their productivity in the workplace.

 

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Presenteeism in the workplace

Presenteeism results in productivity loss, workplace epidemics, or poor health and exhaustion, which can lead to higher absenteeism for longer periods or accidents. Whether it is a physical or mental ailment, employees should be staying home when they are unable to be present at work. Being physically at work is different than being present at work. It is one thing to show up at work; it’s another thing to be actually productive while at work.

 

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Accommodating disabled employees: Can an employee demand to work at a different workplace?

In a recent case, an adjudicator concluded that an employer failed to accommodate an employee on long-term disability who requested that she be permitted to work in a different work location than a co-worker for mental health reasons.

 

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Should employers talk about mental health in the workplace?

Recent news in the media has highlighted competing perspectives on mental health, one story focusing on the importance of mental health privacy, and the other campaigning for speaking out about mental health. Wednesday Jan 27, 2016 has been designated as the Bell Let’s Talk day, meaning let’s talk about mental illness, as part of Bell’s multi-year campaign around the issue. This seems in contrast to a recent human rights decision about student mental health privacy rights at York University.

 

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Police records checks ineffective, invade rights, says civil rights association

Police record checks are a poor tool to assess a candidate’s suitability for a job, according to the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. An inaccurate, incomplete or inconsequential record can dissuade employers from hiring good candidates, and present a substantial barrier to employment for perfectly qualified individuals.

 

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Arbitrators should apply ‘privacy spectrum’ to personal information

The names of people involved in labour arbitration should be disclosed with the arbitrator’s decisions, unless there are compelling reasons not to do so, according to the open-court principle and the public’s interest. The British Columbia Labour Relations Board affirmed the law in a recent review of an arbitrator’s decision. The board also affirmed arbitrators’ […]

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with a new mental health disabilities policy from the Ontario Human Rights Commissions; the Canadian Human Rights Commission guide on accommodating family status; and employer-subsidized personal training and nutritionist services.

 

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A trigger and a tool – New Ontario Human Rights policy on mental health disabilities and addictions

The voluntary guidelines found in the 2013 release of the National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace may no longer be much of a voluntary standard for employers. The Ontario Human Rights Commission (OHRC) released its 109 page Policy on preventing discrimination based on mental health disabilities and addictions Wednesday June 18, 2014.

 

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The business case for banishing the winter blues at work

Is it spring yet?  For some people, cold weather and lack of sunshine can trigger a type of depression more serious than winter blahs. Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and other mental illnesses are rarely talked about at work and often carry serious stigma for those impacted.

 

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Integrating the psychological health and safety standard into existing organizational policies and processes

On January 16, 2013, the Standards Council of Canada (CSA) published a new national standard dealing with psychological health and safety in the workplace. Although not a mandatory standard at this time, it is foreseeable that legislators, health and safety officers and inspectors, adjudicators and tribunals will be influenced by the standard when dealing with psychological and mental health issues in the workplace. In addition, such standards may be absorbed into the employer’s general duty to protect workers from harm in the workplace, which exists in all jurisdictions in Canada. Employers should also scrutinize their workplace operations, policies, procedures and processes under the auspices of the psychological health and safety system recommended in the standard.

 

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Psychological health & safety in the workplace: Now more important than ever

As of January 2013, Canada is now the first country in the world to adopt a national standard for mental health in the workplace. Several health and safety and human rights legislation across Canada already address providing safe and healthy workplaces, the prevention of harassment that includes bullying, sexual harassment, and discrimination based on disability which includes mental illnesses. However, this new standard now gives employers and employees support to make their workplaces psychologically safe and healthy.

 

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Slaw: Psychological health and safety: An action guide for employers

On April 27, 2012, the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) launched Psychological Health and Safety: An Action Guide for Employers to help Canadian employers protect their employees’ mental health. The guide was co-authored by Merv Gilbert, PhD, and Dan Bilsker, PhD, from the Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction at Simon […]

 

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Slaw: Draft of National Standard for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace Released

Last year I told you about the plan to release a voluntary national standard for mentally healthy workplaces. The standard aims to help Canadian employers support the psychological health and safety of their employees by providing them with the necessary guidelines and tools to achieve measurable improvements in psychological health and safety in the workplace.

 

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Slaw: Federal government launches workplace mental health standards initiative

Since the economic burden of mental disorders in Canada has been estimated at $51-billion per year, with almost $20-billion of that coming from workplace losses, the Mental Health Commission of Canada (MHCC) has launched a collaborative project with the Bureau de normalisation du Québec (BNQ) and the standards division of the Canadian Standards Association (CSA Standards) to create a voluntary national standard for mentally healthy workplaces. The standard aims to…

 

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