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people with disabilities

Intersectionality: Re-think your pre-think

We need to take a step back and reassess our assumptions that preclude those who are marginalized. We need to get a sense of how we can think inclusively while building roads to view human diversity as more than a product of a singular association or identity. The concepts of accommodation, accessibility and inclusion that an organization uses have to be robust enough to pay respect to the fact that people are a system of identities that continuously flow and change.

 

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Accessibility is a human rights issue

Accessibility is a human rights issue. When we look at how it is enacted through the Ontario Human Rights Commission, their online trainings, and their policy papers, we can plainly see that this is the case.

 

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Dysfunction of function, accessibility and inclusion.

At this point in time, after having seen the release of the Mayo Moran review of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act(AODA),  it is important to center our focus on how accessibility  is created within a market place. From the outset there have been organizations and businesses that had a tepid response to the AODA because it automatically brings to mind the mythical beast that is the concept of undue hardship.

 

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Accessibility can change the way we think

People with disabilities have traditionally been excluded from decision-making, holding roles of importance, exercising personal autonomy and obtaining gainful employment. Although the view prescribed to people with disabilities has shifted over the years, there persists an underlying theme in which the overarching narrative is one of cultural mistrust.

 

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Human Rights principles and accessibility

This is a great post on this International Human Rights Day. The principles that guide accessibility can be found in a few human rights mechanisms that structure the responsibility to make adjustments of law and policy to allow for equal participation of persons with disabilities.

 

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Global Accessibility Awareness Day – May 9

Today, May 9, 2013, is the second year for Global Accessibility Awareness Day! This day is meant to “get people talking, thinking and learning about digital (web, software, mobile, etc.) accessibility and users with different disabilities”

 

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Learn the latest! — AODA compliance: Benefits of being ahead of the game

Recently, some of our clients received a notice from the government reminding them to file an Accessibility Report. This was an eye opener to employers who have let the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA), Customer Service compliance deadlines slip through the cracks. Some simply forgot to file. However, others were reminded they have not yet implemented all the Customer Service Standard requirements.

 

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An education campaign about courtesy/priority seating signs on transportation vehicles

In the Integrated Accessibility Standards Regulation, under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, there is the Standard for Transportation. Under this standard there is a section about courtesy seating in vehicles, specifically…

 

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Slaw: Recommendations for new Manitoba legislation to remove barriers faced by people with disabilities

Manitoba is the second province in Canada that intends to make their province accessible for persons with disabilities by developing specific standards of accessibility in a number of key areas.

 

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AODA: Protect your organization through documentation

The Accessibility Standards for Customer Service require employers with 20 or more employees to document policies. The Integrated Accessibility Standards require employers to document policies and multi-year accessibility plans if they have 50 or more employees. So smaller organizations might breathe a sigh of relief knowing that they don’t have to document and keep track of their accessibility policies and plans under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA).

 

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AODA: Why do I have to notify the public when there is a disruption of services?

Generally, disruptions to all of your services, such as during a power outage or during a labour dispute, do not require this special notice. However, if the disruption has a significant impact on people with disabilities, you should provide notice of the disruption of service. In Ontario, under the Accessibility Standards for Customer Service, as of January 1, 2012, organizations are required to publicly notify customers of temporary disruptions of services or facilities or if they are expected to be temporarily unavailable in the near future, including the steps to take to access alternative methods.

 

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Service animals and people with disabilities – AODA best practices

In Ontario there is a regulation called the Accessibility Standard for Customer Service. One of the requirements of this regulation is that persons with disabilities are allowed to enter your organization’s public premises with a service animal. A person should be able to remain with the animal unless otherwise excluded by law. If the animal is…

 

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AODA: Inappropriate words can bite – the customer service standard

The Accessibility Standard for Customer Service Regulation obligates Ontario businesses and their employees to communicate with persons with disabilities in a manner that takes into account the person’s disability. Employers must train employees to interact and communicate with people that have various types of disabilities…

 

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Slaw: The AODA era part I: The accessibility standard for customer service, how much time do I have?

The AODA customer service standard outlines what businesses and other organizations in Ontario must do to make their goods and services more accessible to people with disabilities by January 1, 2012. Every person or organization that provides goods and services to members of the public or other third parties, and has at least one employee in Ontario, must comply.

 

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