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Quebec

And now an update on HST transitions!

If you’ve been following the story of Quebec’s efforts to harmonize its sales tax (the QST) with the federal Goods and Services Tax, you probably know that it took a bit longer than expected, besides the 19 previous years of semi-harmonization during which nothing really happened. The federal government and the province originally set a deadline of September 15 to reach a deal, but they subsequently extended the period, and as of Friday, the deed is done—kind of.

 

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Another case of school employee working in sex trade – this time, teacher did not lose job

Remember the case where a Quebec school board terminated an office assistant because she was a porn video star on the side? She was terminated because her off-duty conduct was inconsistent with the school board’s mission and the values the board wished to convey to students. Well, here’s another case where a sex-ed teacher who also worked as a stripper and porn actor was allowed to keep teaching! What was the difference in this case?

 

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Slaw: IQT’s closure: A fine example of poor corporate values!

On July 15, 2011, several workers showed up to work as usual at IQT Solutions, only to be told that their employer had unexpectedly shut down its Canadian operations: three call centres, one in Ontario and two in Quebec. About 1,200 IQT employees were suddenly unemployed with no final paycheque, vacation pay or notice of termination.

 

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What’s that you say? Bar association releases plain language guide

When a guide to using legal jargon in everyday life offers as its first tip, “Familiarize yourself with Latin,” I’m pretty sure there’s a problem.

 

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June 24, Quebec St-Jean Baptiste Day/National Holiday

In Quebec, June 24 is la Fête nationale, the province’s national holiday and celebration of French Canadian culture. All employees in Quebec are entitled to the holiday…

 

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Moral damages: still an unsettled question

A recent case out of the Quebec Superior Court Lysecky v. United Parcel Service of Canada Limited 2010 QCCS 5098 is indicative how the question of “moral damages” is still unsettled law.

 

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Work-life balance incentives

Quebec launches a work-life balance initiative that is said to be unique in all the world. Let’s hope it catches on in other provinces and territories.

 

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High school office assistant by day, porn video star by night – should there be ramifications?

A Quebec school board has suspended a high school office assistant with pay after discovering she also happened to be a porn video star on the side. How did the school board find out about her extra-curricular activity? A student found out her secret and posted it on Facebook, and almost instantly, she was a high school celebrity.

 

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Eight out of ten workers witnessed conflicts in the workplace, so what?

According to a recently released CROP survey carried out for the Ordre des conseillers en ressources humaines agréés (Quebec’s human resources professional association), 79 percent of workers in Quebec often or occasionally witnessed a conflict in their workplace in the last year. The survey also indicates that 62 percent of employees believe their managers are inclined to resolve conflicts, compared to 38 percent who feel they tend to ignore them.

 

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Slaw: CSST services and website available only in French

The Office québécois de la langue française requires that all communications between the Commission de la Santé et de la Sécurité du Travail du Québec (CSST, Quebec’s workplace health and safety board) and employers, suppliers and partners take place in French only, to comply with…

 

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Workplace violence and harassment training

I guess I’m lucky never to have experienced harassment at work and I certainly never expect to at my current job—unless you count some gentle ribbing at the annual croquet tournament. But nevertheless, First Reference recently had its first mandated workplace violence and harassment training session to educate me and my co-workers on the company’s new mandated policies.

 

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Slaw: Can Quebec Bill 94 withstand any Charter challenge?

While Canada perceives it’s role as one of accommodating all forms of religious expression in a neutral manner, Quebec has decided to apply a more restrictive and formally secular approach. At a general level, this means the official separation of church and state. However, this proposed policy of secularity (bill 94) clashes with the religious traditions of many recent immigrants to Canada. To summarize, Bill 94 would require anyone providing or receiving government services to do so with their face uncovered for reasons of identification, security and communication. This includes services from hospitals, schools, universities, and daycare centres that receive provincial funding.

Read the full article on Slaw.ca.

 

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Slaw: Quebec government bill upholds gender equality and secularism

On March 24, 2010, the Quebec government tabled in legislature Bill 94, An Act to establish guidelines governing accommodation requests within the administration and certain institutions. The Bill would create rules on how departments or agencies of the government can provide reasonable accommodation to citizens, certain organizations and public servants. These departments and agencies include health agencies, schools, colleges and universities, and services from child care to nursing homes. To this end, the Bill defines the concept of accommodation, asserts that the government will make any compromise to respect the right to equality between women and men and the principle of religious neutrality of the state, and provides that an accommodation cannot be granted if it imposes an undue hardship on the government department or agency. If enacted, the Bill would come into force on proclamation.

Premier Jean Charest and Justice Minister Kathleen Weil say the Bill upholds gender equality and secularism—the values that unite Quebecers. They said it, not me; but you’ve got to love it!

Read the full article on Slaw.ca.

 

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Are you required to have a pay equity plan?

One purpose of Pay Equity is to redress differences in compensation due to systemic gender discrimination suffered by persons who occupy positions in predominantly female job categories. Only the provinces of Quebec and Ontario have pay equity legislation that covers the private sector. The Pay Equity Act in each province requires employers with 10 or more employees to provide equal pay for work of equal value.

 

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