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News and Discussions on Payroll, HR & Employment Law

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Self-employed

Is anyone interested in PRPPs?

A number of financial institutions and other providers are now offering pooled registered pension plans (PRPPs) and voluntary registered savings plans (VRSPs), the PRPP’s Quebec equivalent. Except for VRSPs, which are mandatory for employers who don’t offer pension plans or other retirement savings plans such as group registered retirement savings plans (RRSPs), how popular are PRPPs likely to be?

 

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Employee v. contractor

The distinction between employees and contractors is an issue that will not go away. As I have written about in the past, there seems to be a trend toward giving workers the option of being treated as an employee or a contractor, though the reality is that this impacts nothing other than how they are paid.

 

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Bills to enact Pooled Registered Pension Plans

As anticipated, since the federal Pooled Registered Pension Plans Act came into force December 14, 2012, several provinces have followed suit and tabled legislation to implement the new kind of portable deferred income plan, which is designed to provide retirement income to workers and self-employed persons who do not have access to an employer-sponsored retirement pension plan.

 

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United States HR Law: ‘misclassifying’ employees as independent contractors

Hiring an employee is an expensive proposition. Employees must be trained, they must be paid regardless of their productivity while they are employed, they have many rights under the law including workers’ compensation coverage, and terminating a difficult employee can be a costly nightmare. In an age of constantly increasing regulation, many businesses are turning to independent contractors to complete work for them because they usually need minimal training and can be acquired or dismissed as the situation warrants.

 

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Not an employee? Not an independent contractor? How the courts define the hybrid

Increasingly, Canadian courts have recognized an in-between class of agents that are not technically employees or not technically independent contractors. Over the past few years, our courts have come up with a hybrid category of agents called “dependent contractors.” These are independent individuals who work so closely with employers, and whose relationship status with their “employer” is so sufficiently long-lasting, as to allow them entitlement for reasonable notice.

 

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