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Trade Union Act

Construction industry certification: Nova Scotia Court of Appeal weighs in

In Nova Scotia, an employer in the construction industry may become certified by a union if the Labour Board is satisfied that the applicant union “has as members in good standing more than fifty percent of the employees in the appropriate unit”.  Accordingly, the definition of the bargaining unit is a significant issue in construction industry certifications because the employees in the unit materially impact whether the certification application is successful.

 

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Certification of contract / part-time workers

Earlier this year, the Nova Scotia Labour Board ruled on an application by Local 849 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees for certification of some technical workers of Egg Studios. Egg Studios is a television commercial and digital content business. It has applied to Nova Scotia Supreme Court for a judicial review of the decision. A hearing on Egg’s application is not expected to take place until March 6-7, 2013, according to court documents. Egg Studios maintains the labour board erred in law by amending the…

 

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Nova Scotia creation of the ‘Superboard’

As Christina Catenacci recently blogged, my home Province of Nova Scotia has taken steps to create a unified labour board. While the establishment of the Labour Board itself has not been the subject of much debate, the Bill that introduced it did create some controversy as it also introduced changes to our Trade Union Act.

 

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Interprovincial labour mobility in the unionized construction sector

I recently received in my mailbox the July/August 2010 issue of Inside HRA from First Reference. It deals with interprovincial labour mobility. It’s an interesting read for anyone who works in human resources across interprovincial boundaries. Although we often take for granted that citizens may live and work in any part of Canada they please, there are often unforeseen problems. Some of these problems can be quite challenging for an employer.

 

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