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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with a recent Ontario Court of Appeal decision that clarified the limitation period for a wrongful dismissal claim starts as soon as working notice is provided, the Morneau Shepell survey which shows employers in Canada are expecting salaries to increase by an average of 2.6 percent in 2019, and guidelines on obtaining meaningful consent.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with major changes to PIPEDA; family status test in Alberta; and termination due to a mental disability.

 

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Can employers publicize terminations via social media? Dallas’ police chief says yes

In the name of transparency and building public confidence in the local police force, Dallas police chief David O. Brown has begun posting announcements of staff terminations and demotions on the social networking services Twitter and Facebook. Chief Brown is surely blazing a trail with the controversial practice, but it remains to be seen whether others will follow—or if it’s even legal…

 

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Theft is no reason to violate an employee’s rights

Imagine you were working as a clerk in a grocery store, and your manager suspected you of stealing some product off the shelf. She has no concrete evidence, only hearsay from a co-worker. An investigation turns up nothing, and you continue working as though nothing had happened. But the manager notified your employer, and your employer added your name to a database of suspected employee thieves, which all sorts of retailers of all sizes subscribe to in order to avoid hiring persons of questionable character.

 

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Canada’s anti-spam law: not as close as we thought?

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Industry Canada and the CRTC have prepared final spam regulations, but Industry’s are undergoing a second round of consultation. The minister has revised the estimated time: “the anti-spam legislation is expected to take effect next year”…

 

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Facebook and employees’ rights

You’ve probably heard by now that some employers in the United States have come up with the idea of asking prospective employees for their Facebook passwords so they can take a closer look at what these candidates are all about. Is it legal? Is it ethical? Is it fair?

 

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Employer and insurer both breached privacy of employee

The Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Alberta has determined that an employer violated the Personal Information Protection Act and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act when it disclosed more information than necessary to determine the employee’s eligibility for disability benefits, and that the group insurance provider used the information without consent.

 

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Anti-spam bill receives royal assent

The Anti-spam bill places restrictions on the type of unsolicited communications organizations can send. You will only be allowed to send commercial electronic messages if the recipient has given express or implied consent. A commercial electronic message is one whose purpose is “to encourage participation in a commercial activity”…

 

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