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immigration status

Four proposed prohibited grounds of discrimination

On September 26, 2018, a private member’s Bill 35, Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2018 was introduced and received first reading in the Ontario legislature. The goal of Bill 35 is to add immigration status, genetic characteristics, police records, and social condition as prohibited grounds of discrimination in Ontario’s Human Rights Code.

 

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There’s a tidal shift happening in human rights – Part II are employers ready for Bill 164?

Bill 164 aims to expand the current protection offered by the Ontario Human Rights Code in relation to citizenship, race and place of origin to add immigration status, which will essentially eliminate an employer’s ability to discriminate on the basis of how long someone has been in the country.

 

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Adding new prohibited grounds in Ontario Human Rights Code

Private member’s Bill 164, Human Rights Code Amendment Act, 2017, introduced on October 4, 2017 in the Ontario Legislature would amend the Ontario Human Rights Code (Code) to include four new prohibited grounds of discrimination including, social condition, police records, genetic characteristics and immigration status.

 

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Employment termination and maintenance of lawful status in Canada

Foreign nationals who hold work permits in Canada sometimes wonder what will happen to their immigration status if they quit their jobs or are terminated by their Canadian employers. Surprisingly, the termination of a foreign national’s employment does not automatically invalidate his or her work permit or underlying temporary resident status. However, foreign nationals who travel abroad after the termination of their employment might not be able to return to Canada even if their work permits technically remain valid.

 

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