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harassment

How an external investigation actually saved money for an employer

A recent Human Rights Tribunal decision demonstrates that the short-term financial costs of an external investigation might also be balanced out by long-term financial savings.

 

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Looking in the mirror: Harassment in legal workplaces

Whether advocating for a client before the Human Rights Tribunal, drafting a Respect at Work Policy or assisting a client with engaging a workplace investigator, many lawyers are familiar with providing advice about harassment at work, but how many of us have thought about harassment in our own workplaces?

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with the 2019 Federal Budget and the tax changes of interest to employers and employees, the elimination of MSP premiums in BC and a look at a case recently in front of the Ontario Court of Appeal regarding the tort of harassment.

 

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Harassers, empty your pockets and pay up! Including personal financial accountability for harassment in employment contracts – key considerations

In January, Variety reported about the new position of John Lasseter, the former Pixar head of animation who was the subject of a workplace harassment complaints from Pixar staffers.

 

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Never too late: Court rejects employee’s attempt to avoid liability for theft

The case discussed in this article is both an encouraging sign for employers who are victims of employee theft, as well as a warning.

 

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Proposed domestic violence leave of absence in Newfoundland and Labrador would take effect January 1, 2019

domestic-violence

Several provinces have created or are beginning to add a statutory domestic violence leave of absence to their employment standards legislation, including Ontario, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. In Newfoundland and Labrador Bill 32 amends the Labour Standards Act to establish such a leave.

 

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No right to sue employer for sexual assault by co-worker: WSIAT

Can an employee sue her employer if she is the victim of sexual assault at work by a co-worker? The Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Appeals Tribunal says no once again, “not if the employee is entitled to WSIB benefits.”

 

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30 tips for a reasonable workplace investigation

In Canada, a requirement to conduct a workplace investigation is triggered in case of harassment, sexual harassment or violence. What then is required of such a workplace investigation? In short, a “reasonable” investigation is required.

 

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Just Cause – Workplace policies remain an important consideration in judicial decision making

Several factors worked against the employer in this case of just cause termination, but most significantly was the lack of robust written policies and procedures on discipline and proper employee training on harassment.

 

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Q&A: Who may be hired as a third party investigator to deal with workplace harassment complaints?

Is there any legislation that dictates who may or may not be hired as a third party investigator?

 

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Recent amendments to Alberta’s Occupational Health and Safety Code bring big changes to Alberta workplaces

This blog provides a summary of some of the key changes to the Alberta’s Occupational Health and Safety Code relating to joint work site health and safety committees, health and safety representatives, harassment and violence.

 

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Workplace investigation alert: BC case shows how employers should NOT handle workplace harassment

A recent case from British Columbia, Wells v. Langley Senior Resources Society, is a useful example of how an employer should not handle workplace harassment.

 

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The Supreme Court of Canada interprets workplace discrimination broadly

In British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Schrenk, 2017 SCC 62, the Supreme Court of Canada considered the scope of section 13(1) of BC’s Human Rights Code, which concerns discrimination “regarding employment or any term or condition of employment.”

 

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Supreme Court of Canada confirms that all workplace harassment is protected – even by third parties

In British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal v. Schrenk, 2017 SCC 62, the Supreme Court of Canada confirmed that human rights legislation is to be interpreted broadly and purposively and specifically found that the protection against workplace harassment is not limited to conduct perpetrated by an individual’s employer or co-worker. This decision will have significant implications for employers and employees alike.

 

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Employee’s secret recording of meetings with management contributes to finding of just cause for dismissal

A recent decision from the Manitoba Court of Queen’s Bench supports that an employee’s use of his work phone to secretly record meetings with management may support an employer’s decision to terminate for just cause.

 

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