First Reference company logo

First Reference Talks

News and Discussions on Payroll, HR & Employment Law

decorative image

gender equality

Pay equity: Employer requirements

Pay Equity is a requirement on Ontario employers to ensure that workers are paid equally for work of equal value, regardless of their gender. The requirement on employers arises out of the Pay Equity Act, which was passed by the Ontario Government in 1987 and became effective January 1, 1988; there was an amendment to this Act in 1993 as well.

 

, , , , , , , ,

Report sets benchmarks for inequality between women and men

Canadian women still experience inequality in economic well-being, education, employment, health, housing, justice, safety, and political and social inclusion, according to a new benchmark report on gender equality…

 

, , , , , , , , , ,

Women in the workplace – another take

The gap between men and women is still very significant when it comes to employees in the top ranks of the financial sector. That is, there are still very few women in senior executive roles in Canada’s financial institutions. Worse yet, there are currently no women in line for a CEO position at a big bank.

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The underrepresentation of women in the workplace

I just read an interesting report about women in the workplace. Essentially, the report suggests that women remain underrepresented relative to their male counterparts, even though they form a highly educated and skilled labour pool in the market. Given the skills shortage that is expected to occur in the near future due to mass retirements of senior baby boomer workers, this is an unsettling finding. But why is this happening?

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Women in the workplace Part I: are women preventing themselves from achieving power in the workplace?

The other day, I read an interesting article regarding an interview with the author of No Excuses: 9 Ways Women Can Change How We Think About Power. The author argues that it is actually women themselves who are preventing the achievement of female power in the workplace.

 

, , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Slaw: Can Quebec Bill 94 withstand any Charter challenge?

While Canada perceives it’s role as one of accommodating all forms of religious expression in a neutral manner, Quebec has decided to apply a more restrictive and formally secular approach. At a general level, this means the official separation of church and state. However, this proposed policy of secularity (bill 94) clashes with the religious traditions of many recent immigrants to Canada. To summarize, Bill 94 would require anyone providing or receiving government services to do so with their face uncovered for reasons of identification, security and communication. This includes services from hospitals, schools, universities, and daycare centres that receive provincial funding.

Read the full article on Slaw.ca.

 

, , , , , , , , , , ,

Slaw: Quebec government bill upholds gender equality and secularism

On March 24, 2010, the Quebec government tabled in legislature Bill 94, An Act to establish guidelines governing accommodation requests within the administration and certain institutions. The Bill would create rules on how departments or agencies of the government can provide reasonable accommodation to citizens, certain organizations and public servants. These departments and agencies include health agencies, schools, colleges and universities, and services from child care to nursing homes. To this end, the Bill defines the concept of accommodation, asserts that the government will make any compromise to respect the right to equality between women and men and the principle of religious neutrality of the state, and provides that an accommodation cannot be granted if it imposes an undue hardship on the government department or agency. If enacted, the Bill would come into force on proclamation.

Premier Jean Charest and Justice Minister Kathleen Weil say the Bill upholds gender equality and secularism—the values that unite Quebecers. They said it, not me; but you’ve got to love it!

Read the full article on Slaw.ca.

 

, , , , ,