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termination notice

Exclusive or near-exclusive economic dependence determinative of dependent contractor status: Ontario Court of Appeal

Between employees and independent contractors exists a third, lesser known category of employment relationship: the dependent contractor. Unlike independent contractors, and subject to specific contractual termination provisions, dependent contractor relationships cannot generally be terminated without notice, or pay in lieu thereof.

 

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Form and substance: Mass termination and working notice requirements clarified by Ontario Court of Appeal

Employment standards statutes in each Canadian jurisdiction contain special provisions for minimum termination notice or pay in lieu thereof, which apply when a prescribed number of employees will be terminated within a particular timeframe.

 

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Failure to repeat termination clause after multiple promotions voids clause

In McKercher v Stantec Architecture (2019 SKQB 100), Justice Elson had a situation where at the time of his hiring as a staff architect, the plaintiff signed an enforceable contract limiting his notice to a maximum of 3 months.

 

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Calculating severance: What do the courts say?

In the past I have written about the different factors that are considered in assessing severance for a termination. Being a lawyer, I also provided the standard cop-out that “there is no formula for determining reasonable notice or severance amounts”.

 

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Employee induced to leave his employment and terminated six months later awarded six months’ pay

Greenlees v. Starline Windows Ltd. demonstrates the willingness of courts to award longer notice periods to short-term employees, particularly when the conduct of the employer induces the employee to leave his previous employment.

 

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Ontario Court of Appeal finds clarity in termination clause

The Court’s reversal in this case, while favourable to employers, emphasizes the occasional unpredictability of the law in this area. It is prudent to periodically review your contractual termination provisions for new hires.

 

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Short service employee gets four months’ pay in lieu of reasonable notice

Some employers erroneously believe that there is a “rule of thumb” in the common law that employees are entitled to a month of notice per year of service. The Ontario Court of Appeal has held that there is no such rule, and that determinations of reasonable notice must be based on an assessment of all relevant factors.

 

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Clock on limitation period for wrongful dismissal claim starts on day of notice – not last day worked

A recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice confirms that the limitation period in respect of a wrongful dismissal claim commences on the day that the employee is provided notice of the termination, not on the last day the employee works.

 

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Employers: Be careful of what you say about former employees to their new employers

Be careful of what you say about former employees to their new employers, warns Toronto employment lawyer, Jeff Dutton. As evidenced in Drouillard v. Cogeco Cable Inc., if a former employer suggests to another employer to terminate a certain employee, the former employer could be liable for damages to that employee by way of the tort of inducing breach of contract.

 

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Can’t afford to keep them, can’t afford to fire them: Poor finances do not reduce termination obligations

Employee salaries and benefits can be some of the greatest costs borne by a business. As a result, when a company faces financial hardship, they will often terminate positions to reduce their costs. However, many employers may not realize that the obligation to provide reasonable notice of termination could negate any short-term cost savings they hoped to realize.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with paid bereavement leave; voiding employment contract; and, terminating long-term employees.

 

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Releases may not protect employers from the tenured employee rule

In Nova Scotia, employees with ten years of service are provided with special protections under the Labour Standards Code. Section 71 of the Code provides that, subject to certain exceptions, an employer can only dismiss an employee with ten years of service or more for just cause. This is called the tenured employee rule.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with termination notice; return-to-work plan; and, Johnstone family status case.

 

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Failure to mitigate damages leads to a reduction in termination notice

The Supreme Court of British Columbia confirmed that following the termination of a senior employee who had over 20 years of service with the employer, the employee was entitled to a reasonable notice period of 17 months considering the Bardal factors. However, due to the employee’s extremely passive attitude towards finding new employment, the notice period was reduced to 14 months. In a nutshell, the employee just did not do enough to seek alternate employment.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with STD/LTD payments and termination notice; the impact of employees playing volleyball during lunch hours; and, how to destroy personal information.

 

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