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Does your company use a human resources management system?

Human resources management systems (also known as human resources information systems) exist “at the intersection between human resource management and information technology.” Usually, this means taking previously disparate HR information and automatically integrating it in such a way that users can gain a clearer picture of what is happening in the company—in a more efficient way than if HR had to gather all of the information from its various sources, and analyze it manually.

This diverse information includes payroll, work hours and overtime, benefits administration, recruiting and development, training and learning, performance records and more. You’ve probably already automated one or more of these services, either internally or via an external service provider; companies commonly outsource payroll and benefits functions, for example. But even so, can you imagine what you could do if all of those functions were integrated and all of that information could be compared with little effort? That’s the promise of human resources management systems.

Read the whole story on HRinfodesk.com.

 

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Social media = time management? (Part 3)

Connected employees are ambassadors for their employers. Some employers might find this frightening, but it is also inevitable. Some companies will worry about the message that their employees are spreading across their social networks and the Internet, and complain about their inability to control it; but others would pay good money for employees who are so engaged that they will work at all hours and act as corporate social media ambassadors at all times.

 

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Social media = time management? (Part 1)

To a casual observer, it might appear that time management has fallen to the wayside at many workplaces today: employees work well beyond their scheduled hours, including while on lunch breaks, during leisure time and social events and even on vacation. But with proper scheduling, time management should prevent work from expanding beyond regular work hours—as was the case before the Internet age. Instead, in the “knowledge economy”, where the smart phone rules, scheduled work hours have become nearly meaningless.

 

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