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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: how working notice is not appropriate when an employee is on a medical leave, Canadian salaries are expected to increase 2.3 percent in 2018 and the OHIP+: Children and Youth Pharmacare program launch.

 

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Dependent contractor receives 12 months pay in lieu of notice

The recent Supreme Court decision of Glimhagen v. GWR Resources Inc., 2017 BCSC 761, illustrates how an independent contractor can become a dependent contractor – an intermediate category on the spectrum between employee and independent contractor.

 

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Parental obligations in the workplace

For many of us who are parents, September feels like the real New Year. Workplace issues can arise with respect to shifting childcare obligations, as kids transition from summer schedules to school schedules. Employers may be met with requests to accommodate worker childcare obligations or requests for time off and should be prepared with respect to how to handle these issues both practically and legally.

 

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Ontario’s employment and labour law reform Bill continues to undergo changes

Just as the summer winds down, we have an update on Bill 148, the Fair Workplaces, Better Jobs Act, 2017. Those who tuned-in for the McCarthy Tétrault webinars on Bill 148 will recall that public consultations were to be held across the province in July to elicit feedback on the draft Bill.

 

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Labour Day is a global and national annual holiday

Across Canada, Labour Day is a public holiday that is observed on the first Monday in September every year. This year, Labour Day is Monday September 4, 2017. Government bodies and agencies, as well as most businesses, are closed on Labour Day.

 

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Update on probationary clauses from Ontario Court of Appeal

Recently, the Ontario Court of Appeal affirmed that the probationary clause, which provided, simply, “Probation…six months”, was enforceable, and that the employee was not entitled to anything more than the one week of pay in lieu of notice of dismissal pursuant to the Ontario Employment Standards Act, 2000 (“ESA”).

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: how a Tribunal addressed disabled employee resignations, a criminal negligence charge against a worker and the long reach of Canadian civil liability for human rights impacts of foreign operations.

 

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A primer on undue hardship and frustration of contract

This blog post provides a primer on the state of undue harship and frustration of contract under Ontario’s Human Rights Code.

 

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Summarizing WSIB’s proposed Rate Framework, part 3

This blog is the final chapter of a three-part series which examines the fundamental proposed changes to WSIB’s method of business classification and application of premium rates.

 

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Ontario Court of Appeal enforces simple probation clause

Employers generally owe their employees common law reasonable notice upon termination without cause. However, as shown in a recent Ontario Court of Appeal case, Nagribianko v. Select Wine Merchants Ltd, if the parties agree to a probation period in an employment contract, the right to common law reasonable notice can be ousted if the employee is terminated within the probationary period.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: an employer who wrongly relied on probation clause to retract offer of employment, a recent Conference Board of Canada report that shows employees are struggling to balance work and eldercare, and protecting your right as an employer to impose temporary layoffs.

 

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Dishonesty in hiring process constitutes cause for dismissal

A recent decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice has confirmed that, in certain scenarios, an employee’s dishonesty in the hiring process will constitute cause for dismissal. In this case, the plaintiff’s claim for wrongful termination was dismissed when the court found that the plaintiff’s omission on a security questionnaire amounted to dishonesty that went to the core of the employment relationship and was irreconcilable with sustained employment.

 

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Court comments on when employers can ask for an independent medical examination

Ontario’s Divisional Court recently confirmed that employers have a right to ask employees to undergo an Independent Medical Examination (IME) in certain circumstances, to facilitate the accommodation process.

 

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Must you include bonuses when calculating lost wages?

In the case, Bain v. UBS, the Ontario Superior Court of Justice tackled the issue of whether bonuses are too be included when calculating the income that an individual would have earned during a period of reasonable notice.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with: a worker’s entitlement for chronic pain disability, corporate income tax changes to curb income sprinkling issues and an employee’s rejected appeal for dismissal of his wrongful termination action.

 

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