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Health and Safety

Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with employment contracts, 2020 payroll rates and illness in the workplace.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with employer responsibilities to employees when a business closes, the employer’s duty to accommodate alcoholism and the 2019-2020 payroll rates.

 

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Embracing the #MeToo movement

#MeToo has quickly caught wind as a widespread movement that sheds light on the prevalence of sexual assault and harassment, particularly in the workplace. As a result of the movement, society’s attitudes towards workplace sexual harassment have started to change; but, has this impacted how courts and tribunals approach sexual harassment cases?

 

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What does the legalization of cannabis edibles in Canada mean for workplaces?

With Cannabis being originally legalized in Canada on October 17, 2018, a year later on the same date, Cannabis edibles have been legalized in Canada. The legalization of Cannabis edibles in Canada permit edibles to be sold and consumed effective October 17, 2019.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with expected salary increases in 2020, worker reluctance to admit mental illness at work and discriminatory hiring practices.

 

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Ministry of Labour inspections

The Ministry of Labour has been busy implementing its Healthy and Safe Ontario Workplaces Strategy. Introduced by the previous Wynne government, the initiative has focused on small Ontario industrial businesses. A small business is one with fewer than 50 workers.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with 2020 EI premium rate and maximum insurable earnings, bad faith terminations and aggravated damages.

 

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Resignations: employers saddled with burden to investigate

When it comes to resignations, the facts matter and the decision of Nagpal v. IBM certainly proves it. In another notable case on resignations in Ontario, Schabas J. had to determine whether an employee’s failure to return to the workplace after his disability benefits were denied amounted to voluntary resignation or abandonment of employment.

 

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Q&A: Frustration of employment

Q&A is a recurring series on the Vey Willetts LLP blog. The aim is to provide quick answers to questions we commonly encounter in our day-to-day practice of employment law. In this edition, we focus on “frustration of employment.”

 

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Boosting safety performance in the workplace

Safety program implementation is crucial within the workplace, but without the ongoing cooperation of employees to uphold safety performance, safety hazards become a greater risk.

 

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Frustration of contract can be resolved by summary judgment – Does not require a trial

Is a stated “desire” to return to work, at some point, and without more information, sufficient to rebut the medical evidence that a contract of employment has become legally frustrated?

 

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5 Key Changes to Newfoundland & Labrador’s OHS Workplace Violence & Harassment Prevention obligations effective January 1, 2020

Violence and harassment is an unfortunate reality of society – and of the workplace. Since April 1, 2019 (when New Brunswick’s new workplace anti-violence and harassment regulations took effect) every Canadian province and territory has an occupational health and safety regulatory scheme dealing specifically with workplace violence.

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with pay increases in 2020, employee burnout and tax payments for RRSP contributions.

 

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Workplace harassment provisions coming to the Canada Labour Code

As many of you know, several new amendments to the Canada Labour Code (“the Code”) came into effect on September 1st. Employers cannot rest just yet – even bigger changes are expected to arrive in 2020 in relation to workplace harassment and violence.

 

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Objective evidence required when attempting to limit or deny an employee’s accommodation request

Recent Ontario human rights jurisprudence has reaffirmed many of the principles associated with the employer’s duty to accommodate. In particular, when assessing accommodation requests, employers need not apply/accept each accommodation request, but must ensure that they are only denying or limiting lawful accommodation requests in the presence of sufficient evidence to support the limitation or denial.

 

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