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labour relations

Federal undertakings involved in construction projects are not subject to a provincial occupational health and safety legislation

Are the provisions of chapter XI of the Act respecting Occupational Health and Safety, pertaining to construction sites and principal contractors, constitutionally applicable to federal undertakings? Such is the question that the Superior Court of Quebec has responded to in Commission des normes, de l’équité, de la santé et de la sécurité du travail c. Commission des lésions professionnelles, 2016 QCCS 2424.

 

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Changing Workplaces Review final report: Sweeping changes to Ontario employment law coming

On May 23, 2017, the Government of Ontario released the Changing Workplaces Review final report by authors C. Michael Mitchell and John C. Murray. It contains 173 recommendations that endorse significant changes to Ontario employment law aiming to create better workplaces with decent working conditions and widespread compliance with the law. The authors consulted with […]

 

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Three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three popular articles this week on HRinfodesk deal with:An Ontario human rights case where an employee’s dismissal by her employer for having lied about when she found out about her pregnancy was ruled to be non-discriminatory; a decision that clarifies that the duty to mitigate does not apply when an employer terminates a fixed-term employment contract before its end date; and an FAQ that looks at an employee who is looking for accommodation to care for their child because they cannot afford daycare.

 

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The Ontario Employment Law Conference is better than ever

Learn the latest!

Early Bird Registration Now Open: 16th Annual Employment Law Conference. Come and learn the latest!

 

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Slaw: Supreme Court confirms right to strike constitutionally protected

The Supreme Court of Canada in Saskatchewan Federation of Labour v Saskatchewan confirmed once and for all that the right to strike is protected under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

 

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Surreptitious tape recording of bargaining negotiations not admitted into evidence

The issue in this case was whether a surreptitious tape recording of bargaining negotiations was allowed to be admitted into evidence.

 

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Slaw: Employment law and First nation band

In Canada, jurisdiction over employment law is normally within the authority of each province or territory, unless the employer or activity falls under the federal jurisdiction. This is a straightforward distinction under normal circumstances, but, in certain areas, it remains unclear. This was the case in Fox Lake Cree Nation v. Anderson, 2013

 

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It’s time for Saskatchewan employers to review HR policies

On April 29, 2014 the Saskatchewan government finally proclaimed the Saskatchewan Employment Act to be in force. The most notable changes in the Saskatchewan Employment Act in respect of employment standards are the following:

 

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Most-viewed articles this week on HRinfodesk

The three most viewed articles on HRinfodesk this week deal with the difficulty of characterizing the employment relationship as that of independent contractor, the taxability of employer-paid membership fees and the high price of age discrimination.

 

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Slaw: Consolidating labour legislation: Proposed Saskatchewan Employment Act

The new Saskatchewan Employment Act clearly defines the rights and responsibilities of employees, employers and unions… The new Act will improve Saskatchewan’s labour legislation to better protect workers, promote growth and increase accountability

 

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Supreme Court restricts agricultural workers’ freedom of association

The Supreme Court of Canada has finally released its decision in Ontario (A.G.) v. Fraser affecting the working lives of agricultural workers in Ontario. The decision demonstrates just how divided opinions are on the question of limiting workers’ freedom of association under section 2(d) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, particularly restricting unionization and collective bargaining.

 

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